Poplar River Power Station

 

Commissioned: 1981
Location: Coronach, SK
Fuel source: Coal
Net capacity: 582 MW

  • More facts

    • Two units with a combined generating capacity of 582 MW.
    • The first unit (with a generating capacity of 291 MW) was commissioned in 1981.
    • The second unit (with a generating capacity of 291 MW) was commissioned in 1983.

Emission Control Research Facility

The Poplar River Power Station is home to SaskPower’s Emissions Control Research Facility (ECRF).

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    • The ECRF evaluates various technologies for controlling emissions (such as mercury) to determine how the process will perform when fully installed at a power station. In the future, the ECRF will also evaluate processes to reduce other emissions.
    • The ECRF is the only facility of its kind in Canada where a continuous sample of real flue gas can be taken from a power station and tested. The only other option is to conduct tests in a pilot plant facility with a burner that could simulate a coal-fired boiler.
    • The key to the success of the ECRF has been a strong team of various partners—including the federal government, both Saskatchewan universities, the Saskatchewan Research Council, private business, and the U.S. electrical utilities and organizations—whose involvement ensured the work performed meets the needs of numerous utilities across Canada and North Dakota.
    • In January of 2009 we received a national environmental stewardship award, presented by the Canadian Electricity Association (CEA) as part of the CEA’s Environmental Commitment and Responsibility program.

Book at Tour

Tours take place at 9:30 a.m. and 1:00 p.m. from March through December. Call (306)267-2078 and allow us one day’s advance notice for your requested tour date. Tours cover the power station and local coal mine.

Coal-Fired Stations

In a thermal power station, fuel (coal or natural gas) is 138 burned in a boiler to convert water to steam.

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    The high-pressure steam is directed into a turbine, which turns the turbine shaft. This shaft, connected to an electrical generator, produces electricity as it turns.

    A condenser converts the spent steam from the turbine back to water that is reused in the boiler. The condenser cooling water comes from the reservoir and is returned for reuse.

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