5 Questions About Switching to LED Streetlights

June 20, 2019

Lee Miller

Streetlights light our way home at night by keeping us safe. With advancing technology LED streetlights offer more benefits, for you and the environment. That’s why we’re switching to LED streetlights. We sat down with Lee Miller, Engineer in Training, Distribution Assets to find out more about the benefits of this project.

Quotables:

  • LED lights use about 40 to 60% less energy than our current High-Pressure Sodium Vapour (HPSV) bulbs. This helps us reduce energy demand and our carbon footprint.
  • With about 98,000 streetlights across the province, making the switch is the smart choice.
  • We’re focusing on the large urban city subdivisions in 2019-20. That means we’ll be working in Regina, Saskatoon, Moose Jaw and Lloydminster.
  1. Why are you switching to LEDs?

    Switching to LED streetlights will not only help the environment but help keep you safer.

    LED lighting produces truer colours. Making it easier for you to see objects. They also need less maintenance. Meaning less streetlight outages.

    LED lights use about 40 to 60% less energy than our current High-Pressure Sodium Vapour (HPSV) bulbs. This helps us reduce energy demand and our carbon footprint.

    With about 98,000 streetlights across the province, making the switch is the smart choice. 

  2. Is my area getting LED streetlights?

    We’re focusing on the large urban city subdivisions in 2019-20. That means we’ll be working in:

    • Regina
    • Saskatoon
    • Moose Jaw
    • Lloydminster

    We plan to update areas throughout the province to LED bulbs in the next 10 years. We’ll switch over areas in order of:

    • Heavy Traffic Corridors in Large Cities, Provincial/National Parks (Now complete)
    • Heavy Traffic Corridors in Small Cities (Now complete)
    • Large City Subdivisions
    • Large Towns, Small City Subdivisions
    • Small Towns
    • Villages, Hamlets, Rurals

    We made this priority list based on safety risks and energy cost savings.

  3. How much is this costing? Are rates going up?

    No, rates won’t go up. As we switch to more and more LED streetlights municipalities may notice savings.

    For this year, we’re changing 8,800 lights for a total investment of $2.8 million.

  4. What are you doing with the old fixtures?

    Switching to LED streetlights means changing the entire light fixture – not just the bulb. That’s why if the fixtures are still good, we’ll salvage them and reuse them for maintenance. This way we’re not wasting working fixtures. Any fixtures or bulbs that can’t be reused are recycled.

  5. Were any health and environmental concerns considered for this project?

    Yes. ‘White’ light can negatively affect our health. That’s because it restricts melatonin production in our bodies. This can affect our circadian cycles and sleep.

    So we waited to get LED lights with a colour temperature of 3000 kelvin to avoid these health concerns. This is the warmest colour on the market for LED streetlighting.

    LED lighting is more environmental friendly. LED lights are dark-sky compliant, it’ll reduce the amount of light pollution in the sky. They’re also non-toxic and don’t contain mercury. Meaning they don’t need a special disposal process.

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